Arts & Recreation

Feather Reine: Healing through Dance

Feather Reine shares her experience of growing-up as a troubled teen, disconnected from her family and culture. Through pow wow dancing, she begins healing, reconnecting with herself and her community. She now hopes that her message can be an inspiration for other young Indigenous people going through similar circumstances.

National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls: Visual Art

In November 2017, the National Inquiry into Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women & Girls arrived in Edmonton, Alberta. High school students were invited to take part and examine the impact on communities and families. Together, they created
artwork to honour the lives of the missing and murdered women.

National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls: Music

In November 2017, the National Inquiry into Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women & Girls arrived in Edmonton, Alberta. Elementary school students were invited to take part and learn about the impact on communities and families. They were also given an opportunity to interview one another on camera with iPads.

Terry's Traditional Arts Collection

Coat and gloves made by artisan near Assumption.

Art and Atisan Displays

This collection of photos is a mix of artwork from different events. These photos are not for reproduction, they are copyright to the artists.

North American Indigenous Games 2008 - Cowichan Reserve, BC

Some of these photos inlclude: Lieutenant Governor, Waneek Horn-Miller, Shirley Firth, and Conway Koonenay

North American Indigenous Games 2008 - Cowichan Reserve, BC

International teams at grand entry of 2008 NAIG

First Meetings Project Photograph Exhibit

The project staged a setting where French/European Voyageurs men first meet the Aboriginal peoples in their camps and villages. The idea was to portray the true setting, where Canada’s First peoples are seen as healthy, friendly people who helped the first white voyageurs and settlers live on the land.  Many ideas and artworks of the “First Meeting” have been portrayed in history as negative, scary and shown in an idealized, romantic light.  We created an environment that was closer to the true history of the first meetings, where First Nations peoples are portrayed as healthy, kind and helpful people who shared their resources with men who had been travelling for months and in most cases were starving.

The exhibit is up in Galerie Cite until April 2018, and video components of the project will be up on the La Cite Francophone website in February.  https://www.lacitefranco.ca/galerie-cite